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Logo plagiarism: the devil is in the details

March 29th, 2017

Logo design plagiarism controversies are one of the most common topics our blog deals with. However, even as we defend some designers and accuse others, you may have noticed that we have never approached things from a purely legal perspective. Why?

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How simple is too simple in logo design

January 26th, 2017

If you are a fan of tennis, you are probably following the Australian Open, and if so, you may have noticed that just about everyone, aside from Federer, seems to be wearing the same Nike outfit for whatever reason, right down to the sneakers! Not exactly convenient for telling one athlete from the other. How funny that the logo for the tournament should suffer from the exact same issue as well?

 

The updated logo of the Australian Open has made very few fans so far. According to a poll conducted by The Huffington Post Australia, 66 percent of respondents prefer the old logo over the new one. The overwhelming opinion is that the replacement simply fails to convey the essence of the tournament as well as the old logo – depicting a tennis player in the glare of the scorching Australian sun – did.

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Meetup's new logo: Beyond the nametag

October 5th, 2016

 

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Netflix's New Logo: Double Trouble?

June 28th, 2016

 

Seems like the lion’s share of the articles in our blog consists of a) companies replacing their iconic logos by more app -friendly ones (usually to the great displeasure of the public) and b) logo design plagiarism controversies. So today, as a special treat, we’re covering a case that merges both! Except the logo is not actually being replaced. And there’s not really a plagiarism controversy. Don’t worry, it will all become clear in a moment.

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In with the old logo design?

June 2nd, 2016

New old logo

As you may have noticed, rebranding is a common topic in this blog. Updating a logo to a more modern one is a common practice – everyone wants to be up to date and with the flow. But The Co-operative Group, also known as the Co-op, chose to take the road less traveled by instead reinstating a previous logo of theirs – one that is almost 50 years old!

 

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Insta Indignation

May 17th, 2016

 

A couple of months ago we have talked about how Larry the Twitter bird has been turned from a mascot-style logo into a flat monochrome shape over the years, and concluded that the simplification was all but inevitable in today’s design environment. Now, we have been proven right.

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Coca-Cola Comparable Cans Cause Controversy

May 3rd, 2016

 

Red is Original. Silver is Diet/Light. Black is Zero Sugar. Green is Life. That’s how it has always been… but soon, it shall no longer be so.

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Cooler and Controversial logo design

April 5th, 2016

Does Rhode Island’s new logo, created by acclaimed designer Milton Glaser, really pale before this replacement created by local designer in 10 minutes?

 

New Rhode Island logo created by Milton Glaser

 

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Double Entendre

March 29th, 2016

Tesla uses a logo with a double meaning to get around branding issue that prevented them from spelling out the word “sex” with the names of their new car models. Yes, really.

 

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Twitter logo transformation

March 23rd, 2016

The changes underwent by Twitter’s bird logo demonstrate the popularity of cleaner, simpler logos in this day and age.

 

The famous (or infamous, depending on how you look at it) social media site Twitter is celebrating its tenth birthday. Over its ten years of existence, Twitter has gone through a multitude of logos. We have discussed some of them before, but very little weight in the article was given to the main attraction: Larry the Twitter bird itself, which has undergone some interesting changes over the course of its existence. This article aims to correct the oversight.

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Magnolia Mania Logo

March 22nd, 2016

Palm Beach jeweler accuses actress Reese Witherspoon of plagiarizing her Magnolia Collection’s logo and using it for her clothing line Draper James.

 

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55 Olympic Games Logo Designs Since 1896

December 21st, 2015

This is complete collection of 55 Olympic games logos and graphics SINCE 1896.

 

55 olympic  games logos

 

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IKEA logo concept makes perfect sense

December 4th, 2015

The logo of everyone’s favorite Swedish flat-packed furniture retailer has changed very little since 1967. Though once-upon-a-time black and white, and for a short time red and white, the familiar blue workmark inside a yellow oval has been IKEA’s trademark since 1983.

 

 

But Scottish design firm Freytag Anderson thought it was time for a rebrand. In a recent issue of Icon Magazine, the design firm showcased its ideas for a new Ikea branding concept – and you know what? It makes perfect sense.

 

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Ghostbusters logo designer dies aged 70

November 24th, 2015

As a child of the 1980s, there are few logos of that era more recognizable to me than that of the Ghostbusters franchise. Sadly, the logo’s creator, Michael C. Gross, has died at the age of 70 after a battle with cancer.

Gross, a graphic designer and movie producer, in fact admitted that the Ghostbusters logo – the iconic image of the white ghost inside a red ‘no’ symbol – wasn’t his original idea, but he is remembered as the man who developed the concept and made it famous.

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Playboy Bunny makes more money

October 16th, 2015

Don’t worry, this article is safe for work!

To the surprise of many, it was recently revealed that men’s ‘entertainment’ magazine Playboy is going ‘non nude’. Starting with the March 2016 issue, Playboy will no longer feature naked women in its magazines or website.

The reason? According to a Playboy chief executive, nudity is “just passé” these days. ‘Proper’ porn is so widely available on the internet it seems there is just no need for the ‘lite’ brand of titillation Playboy offers. Furthermore, it’s incompatible with today’s social media-hungry consumers: because nudity is banned on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, Playboy can’t avail itself of the clicks and likes that other magazines thrive on for publicity.

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