Home> 50 Logo Design Styles And Techniques

50 Logo Design Styles And Techniques

November 27th, 2013

There is no one true approach to logo design. A wide variety of design styles and techniques can be employed by designers in their efforts to create a memorable logo. In this article, we try to make an inventory of every different category a logo can fall into. You will notice that style, layout, form, technique and subject elements are all included. Logos typically fall into a combination of these categories - it is virtually impossible to see a logo fall into only one of them. For example, a logo can be a unique font with multicolored letters, a 3D graphic with gradients to spice it up, or an animal drawn in a childlike manner.

Some say that creativity consists in the ability to take several oft-used elements and to arrange them in a whole new way. This is certainly the case in logo design. Even though none of these categories individually is very original on its own, great logo designers will take a few of them and creatively combine them into something unique and outstanding.

1. Separate icon

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2. Unique font

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3. One letter graphic

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4. Initials

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5. Integrated graphic and text

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6. Crest

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7. Seal

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8. Text in shape

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9. Cursive text

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10. 3D graphics

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11. Symmetry

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12. Transparency

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13. Gradient

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14. Outline

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15. Illustration

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16. Basic shape

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17. Negative space

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18. Cartoon character

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19. Mascot

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20. Stamp

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21. Logo label

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22. Pattern

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23. Hidden object

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24. Double meaning

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25. Symbol

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26. Ornament

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27. Victorian

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28. Art deco

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29. Vintage

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30. Multicolored abstract

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31. Industrial

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32. Western

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33. Elements collage

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34. Multicolored letters

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35. Black outline

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36. Brushstroke

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37. Ink and pen graphic

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38. Lithography

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39. Tribal art

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40. Folk

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41. Graffiti

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42. Grunge

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43. Childlike

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44. Watercolors

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45. Mosaic

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46. Offset

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47. Animal

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48. Flags

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49. Origami

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50. Blended lines

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 If you have any suggestions for other logo design styles and techniques that we have not mentioned, you're welcome to leave a comment and tell us what you think!

 

 

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Thank you, James!

by PavelSeptember 23, 2016
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Great article

by James EdmanSeptember 19, 2016
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Daryl, WOW, nice feedback. We can almost make a separate post out of your comment. Thank you

by PavelDecember 13, 2013
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Really neat breakdown. Logo's are weird things. They portray your attitude / outlook toward consumers. They portray your business ethic. They portray the services / products you offer. And all conveyed with a mysterious element. A logo should never blatently portray your services. The mysterious / abstract element in a logo should allow the viewer to take your logo in and relate it to something so that it is ingrained in their memory.. like you are, in a way, 'allowing them to finish your sentence (logo) for you'. They must be simple (the logo's, not the consumers); as too many elements in a logo will actually leave 'nothing' for the viewer to absorb (a persons memory bank isn't infinite, so your logo should be simple, relative and POP!). By too many elements, I mean, don't use a fancy typeface AND a detailed image; you need just one element to draw the viewers attention and 'upload it into their memory drive' :) My favourite logos are probably ones that use negative space. It tells potential consumers that you think outside the box; that your outlook is not one-dimensional. I must say, simple as it is, the Diamond Paper logo is also very clever. And I'm assuming it wasn't conceived right off the bat. I didn't even have to go back up the list to get that name again. But, ultimately, your logo is just one aspect of your identity. It can't carry your company into the future, only you can do that by strategically marketing your company through relative mediums, 'using' your logo as your mascot and spokesperson (metaphorically speaking, ofcourse). 2nd last point - The design of your letterheads, email signatures, etc.. also play a role in creating your identity. The layout and graphic elements of these mediums need to tie in with your logo to help form a well-rounded brand. Lastly, and most importantly - Colour! It's really the most important element of any brand. Colour definitely triggers emotions. But be careful; the wrong shade / tint / tone / hue of yellow and you go from exciting the viewer, to making them cry. Blue is the most popular colour worldwide. It is very a calming colour; possibly because it reminds one of water (life-giving liquid) or the sky. Imagine the sky was red.. how eery would that be. Yes, now it would be, but if was always red, we might see red as a calming colour. If we didn't we, would probably go bonkers because the sky is in your face all day long. A survival / coping mechanism I guess. Sorry for the rant, but colour, in my opinion, is so critical in conveying your attitude and receiving the best emotional response possible from the viewer. How would you relate to Facebook if their logo was pink / brown...? I don't think they played a game of rock, paper, scissors to choose the colour, they chose their shade of blue to give the viewer a feeling of calmness, security; and to have the viewer see them as a strong company, well-structured and trustworthy. There are always exceptions to the rule though. Life would be pretty boring without them :)

by DarylDecember 09, 2013
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Awesome inspiring logos! I never thought it can be classified or collected. Very extended review. Love it.

by PavelNovember 29, 2013
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Nice article. I think this just about covers the various logo design styles. I especially like the selection of logos you chose, most of those really are very creative.

by AnansiNovember 24, 2013