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New Yahoo logo has been revealed

September 10th, 2013

So, here it is – the logo we’ve all been waiting for. After a month of being teased with a different logo design each day for thirty days, internet search engine and multimedia company Yahoo! finally puts us out of our misery. Drum roll please….

 

 

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Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv

September 6th, 2013

There is an incredible amount of talent in the world of logo design, so in this blog post I’d like to take a few minutes to celebrate one of my favorite design agencies, other than LogoBee of course!

Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv is a stalwart in the design and branding industry. Founded by Ivan Chermayeff and Tom Geismar in the late 1950s, and joined by third partner and designer Sagi Haviv in 2006, over the last five decades the company has worked with some of the biggest names on the planet. Their impressive client list includes the likes of Mobil, Xerox, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Rockerfeller Center, NBC, Time Warner, Merck, National Geographic, and many, many more. To say these guys are in the major league is an understatement!

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Yahoo! - logo update

August 30th, 2013

As some of you may know, Yahoo is in the process of replacing their old logo. Right now, the company is showcasing 30 different logo designs over 30 days, one logo every day. We are not sure how the selection process works, as we couldn't find any user voting feature on the site. The big reveal is scheduled for September 5th! There are no news on who designed the samples or who will be making the final decision.

Here at LogoBee, we've decided to experiment with a few ideas of our own. Here is a list of 6 logo samples designed by our team. Their styles vary from conservative to liberal. Personally, we believe a simple cleanup of the old logo (removing all the serif add-ons on the letters) would be a good choice for Yahoo.

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New Brooklyn College President rejects phallic logo

August 21st, 2013

Businesses often decide on a change of image when a new leader takes the reins – out with the old and in with the new in more ways than one, so to speak. This was certainly true when Karen L. Gould became the new President of Brooklyn College, a higher education institution that forms part of the City University of New York.

According to sources, Gould, the first female President in the college’s 80-year history, felt that the former College logo ­– a silhouette of the campus’ imposing Georgian clocktower (see below left) – was “too phallic”.

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Yahoo! Showcases Thirty Logos in Thirty Days

August 14th, 2013

Internet search engine company Yahoo! has announced that it will soon be replacing its distinctive purple ‘exclamation point’ logo, but it will showcase a different logo every day before choosing the final design.

Yahoo! was founded back in 1995, right around the time that having access to the internet at home started to become popular with consumers. In the first year, the young start-up company experimented with some brightly colored designs (see below), which incorporated the signature exclamation point. As the brand became more popular – remember, this was before the days of Google, so Yahoo! quickly became one of the most popular internet search engines – it wasn’t too long before an established logo was introduced Read the rest of this entry »

Innovative Colorado closes in on a new brand identity

August 8th, 2013

Apple, Microsoft, McDonald’s, Pepsi – these are all successful brands that we know and recognize – but the state of Colorado as a brand?

In an innovative effort to boost tourism, attract new business and give Colorado a recognizable identity distinct from its neighboring states, Colorado’s governor John Hickenlooper launched a competition to design and develop a branding concept that could be used on official documents, tourism websites and by local businesses.

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New owner, new logo – Smoothie King smoothes it out

August 1st, 2013

You don’t have to be a fitness freak or health guru to realize that nutritional drinks are a hot trend right now. Energy drinks, protein shakes, lactose-free milk, power juices – nobody seems to drink plain water anymore!

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Hootie gets a makeover

July 24th, 2013

A travesty to feminism, or harmless fun? Love it or hate it, whatever your view, there’s no denying that the Hooters chain of restaurants is certainly iconic. The great-tasting chicken wings, the cold beer on tap, the warm and friendly atmosphere – oh yes, and the Hooters Girls with their skimpy orange shorts and tight white t-shirts!

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Pats go out with the old and in with the new

July 8th, 2013

Fans of American Football team the New England Patriots will notice that something has changed about their team’s look recently – the logo.
The Patriots’ previous typographical logo was a swirling, old fashioned, blue-edged, white cursive font that has featured on team kit and merchandise since 1993 (see below left). This is now being dropped after 20 years in favor of a fresher, less traditional look for the 2013 season and beyond. The new logo will now feature a bolder, spikier, capitalized block font (below right), though will retain the blue color scheme to ensure some continuity, and while the font has become less curvy, the ‘Patriot’ logo – known to some as the ‘Flying Elvis’ – has become a little more rounded and now appears middle-bottom of the team’s name.

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This logo has been confirmed to be Motorola Mobility's new logo design

July 1st, 2013

Ever since Google bought the company for $12.5 billion, Motorola Mobility has gone though many ups and downs. Although, the most recent development is the most noticeable and is getting people talking.

It was confirmed that Motorola is leaving behind the simple red circle for something with more color variety. As you may notice from the image, the new logo boasts a multicolored circle with Motorola's signature M inside. I guess the company's web department is a little late, because the new design isn’t on its website yet. The font was altered as well. It used to be all capital letters and italicized. Now, it’s lowercase and using thinner lines. In addition, the logo now bears a tagline: “a Google company”. It must have been Google’s idea to add it in order to show who’s in charge now.

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The Three Elements to a Solid Logo Design Plan

May 24th, 2013

By: Deborah Sweeney, CEO of MyCorporation.com

Nearly every small business owner knows how to plan – one of the first steps towards starting your own business is drafting a business plan. But few actually use that skill for anything beyond organizing their workday, or writing a proposal. Jobs like designing a logo really do benefit when the organic, creative process is focused with a plan. But since this is handled a little bit differently than that of a traditional business plan, what elements should be incorporated into a design plan?

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Branding… in more ways than one

May 10th, 2013

Why does Rapid Realty reward employees for getting the company’s logo tattooed anywhere on their body?


Image source: mix967.ca

The concept of the “human billboard” is not exactly novel. We have all seen people sandwiched between a couple of boards, or racers proudly wearing dozens of logos all over their clothes. It is only logical the next step would be logos tattooed directly on someone’s body.

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3 great misconceptions about logo design

April 20th, 2012

I don’t like any of the samples I have received! This company must be terrible!

multiple logo designs

Sometimes you can receive a group of samples that just don’t appeal to you, it happens. Most of the time a client doesn’t know or can’t precisely describe what kind of logo he wants or what image he is looking for. For that reason, a good designer will try to question the client as much as possible regarding their preferences and tastes in logos, but this is not always sufficient. Also note that sometimes an idea may seem good at first thought, but looking at the results on paper you could realize that you don’t like them at all. It is natural to get upset if you have received a package of samples that don’t suit you, but it`s important to understand that since you are not buying a premade product, bad surprises are not impossible nor improbable. Look at a batch of bad initial samples as just another step towards a great final design. It is highly unlikely that you will utterly hate everything about the samples presented. You can pick and combine different elements from them - font, color, object, layout – into one great logo. Even if the samples are really terrible, you could tell the designers precisely what you don’t like about them, which will help them avoid similar mistakes in the next samples. A bad batch of samples, depending on your view of it, can be a glass half empty or a glass half full. It’s a setback, perhaps, but the second round has a much greater chance of success.

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Logo Guide 2 (Abstract or Identifiable)

April 13th, 2012

logo designs

In this article, I wish to discuss some issues with abstract logo images and identifiable ones. We often get requests from clients asking to create an image that identifies their companies’ business. It is a perfectly proper request. But the client also wants it to be unique, something that no one else is using rather than a common and overused symbol. However, this creates a problem. What do you consider an identifiable symbol? A red cross, in North America, is associated with medical service and ambulance. When you see this symbol you recognize a medical service, despite the fact that it doesn’t show a hospital bed, a doctor treating a patient, or a car driving to a hospital. Most identifiable symbols do not really show the service, yet they are so commonly and often used that they become a standard. Now let’s get back to the client’s request. Take for example a dentist. What are the most common and standard symbols identified with dental health? A tooth and a toothbrush, obviously. When a designer receives a request from a dentist who wants an identifiable logo for his business, but doesn’t want to have overused symbols such as a tooth and a brush, what exactly is the designer to do?

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Logo Guide 1 (Complexity)

April 9th, 2012

There is a big debate over the complexity of a logo. There are some obvious benefits to simple logos. They are by far the most versatile and easily identifiable. Just look at the logos of Apple, Sony, Honda, Nike, or Guci.
simple logo designs





 

 

These logos are easy to reproduce in any size and any color, even black and white. They are easy to embroider or emboss on nearly any apparel or material. These logos are easy to make out from afar and easy to identify.

Not everything about simple logos is so great, though. It is extremely difficult to come up with a new shape and make it interesting. If you look at Nike’s logo, it is not a piece of art per say, but it is a unique shape, which makes the logo timeless and original.

From a client’s point of view paying money for a simple square or half a circle just isn’t worth it. We often hear our clients say: “Well this is not very creative” or “I could have made the same logo myself”. Indeed, simple logos (sometimes just a letter or a simple geometrical shape) just don’t look like much work has gone into them. And yet, take a look at the most famous and recognized logos out there: IBM, JVC, Google, DELL, IKEA...
logo designs




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